Wayne's Pivots Pro
Wayne's Pivots Pro
Midpoint pivots, next period's pivots, and highlighted strategies.

Features

  • See the next period's pivot points as they develop.
  • Midpoint pivots for more precise target and entry zones.
  • Pivot Bias setups display only the pivot points needed for your trade plan.
  • Customize any of the pivot's colors, lines, text, or highlights in groups or individually.
  • Built to work with Pivot Probabilities.
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Trading Rules

Sections:

  • Five Major Components of Wayne's Pivots Pro
  • Pivot Bias Strategies
  • Advanced Setups
  • Indicator Settings
  • Extra: Pivot Strategy Matrix

Five Major Components of Wayne’s Pivots Pro

  1. Midpoint Pivots
  2. Pivot Zones
  3. Next Period’s Pivots
  4. Pivot Bias Strategies
  5. Pivot Conditions

1. Midpoint Pivots

Midpoint pivots is the halfway point between any two sets of pivot points. Simply take the price levels of any two pivots, divide them by 2, and you get a midpoint pivot.

Wayne’s Pivots Pro offers a few ways of labeling these midpoint pivots, as there’s no standardized label for midpoint pivots.

2. Pivot Zones

The area between any two pivots could be considered pivot zone.

When writing out pivot zones, the “Lower Pivot – Higher Pivot” format is used. Where the pivot with the lower price is labeled first, and then the pivot with the higher price is labeled second.

For example, when combining two zones for the Bullish Range Bias Strategy, it uses the pivot zones S1 - L1 and H1 - R1

To easily identify if price is inside a strategy's entry or exit zone, Wayne's Pivots Pro will highlight the active area by updating the color and drawing a line around the zone.

3. Next Period’s Pivots

When price is trading in the current period’s pivot, Wayne’s Pivots will display the Next Period’s Pivots in the future on the right. All the price data from the current period will be used by the indicator to forecast where the next period’s pivots will print.

As price gets closer to the end of the current period, the next period’s pivots move less. Becoming more accurate.

We use this to inform us of where pivot entry and profit zones will generally end up ahead of time. Letting you plan for trades in the future much more easily according to your bias.

4. Pivot Bias Strategies

Combining different pivot zones, we can create a strategy where we entry in one zone and exit in another. In Wayne’s Pivots Pro there are preconfigured entry and exit zones for bullish and bearish trading strategies.

There are two conditions that must be met in order to select the best strategy.

  1. You have a bias on the direction of the market.
  2. You have a bias on the volatility of the market.

You are bullish or bearish if you have a directional bias, and you can change the strategic approach based on how much volatility you expect to occur in the market.

Every Pivot Bias includes a Stop Loss level. This allows for simple risk/reward calculations for all the strategies provided.

5. Pivot Conditions

There are four basic ways the current set of pivot points can be categorized as conditions relative to the prior set of pivot points:

  • Increasing 📈: the central pivot from the current pivot points is higher than the central pivot from the prior set.
  • Decreasing 📉: the central pivot from the current pivot points is lower than the central pivot from the prior set.
  • Compressed 🗜: the current R3 is lower and S3 is higher than the R3 and S3 pivot points from the prior period.
  • Expanded 💥: the current R3 is higher and S3 is lower than the R3 and S3 pivot points from the prior period.

Wayne's Pivots Pro will display each icon in the descriptions above when a Pivot Condition is met. This helps keep pivot point traders completely aware of how the current pivot point is performing relative to the prior one at a glance.

Pivot Bias Strategies

There are currently six Pivot Bias Strategies, each with a bullish and bearish variant.

The four Pivot Bias Strategies are:

  1. Standard
  2. Range
  3. Continuation
  4. Counter Trend
  5. Extension
  6. Chicken

1. Standard

The Standard setup is used when you have a clear directional bias on an asset.

Bullish

Entry: L1 - CP

Profit: H2 - R2

European PMI release and Bank of Canada rate hike.
Bearish

Entry: CP - H1

Profit: S2 - L2

The monthly pivot that EURUSD went to parity.
2. Range

The Range Bias is the most common setup of all the strategies. There are more Range trade opportunities than any other setup.

The Range setup is used when you have a moderate directional bias on an asset, or a period where you expect volatility to stay the same or potentially decrease.

Bullish

Entry: S1 - L1

Profit: H1 - R1

Bearish

Entry: H1 - R1

Profit: S1 - L1

3. Continuation

The Continuation setup is used when momentum from the prior period is expected to continue into the next period. Calling for a more aggressive pivot entry.

Bullish

Entry: CP - H1

Profit: H2 - R2

Bearish

Entry: L1 - CP

Profit: S2 - L2

4. Counter Trend

The most risky setup is the Counter Trend Bias, where you rally to an extended pivot point and then rally back close to the Central Pivot.

This setup is more likely to occur when there is event risk or periods of elevated volatility.

Bullish

Entry: L2 - S2

Profit: L1 - CP

The trading day bordered by two blue lines is a successful Counter Trend trade.

Bearish

Entry: H2 - R2

Profit: CP - H1

The trading day bordered by two blue lines is a successful Counter Trend trade.
5. Extension

The Extension setup is used when you have a strong directional bias on an asset, and you anticipate high volatility in the same direction as the bias for the period.

Bullish

Entry: L1 - H1

Profit: H3 - R3

Bearish

Entry: L1 - H1

Profit: L3 - S3

Trade entries taken from Standard and Continuation strategies can be transitioned into an Extension trade, because an Extension trade's entry zone overlaps with the Standard and Continuation strategies. If an Extension trade is identified, e.g. higher volatility and momentum is realized; then Standard and Continuation trades can be converted into an Extension trade simply by targeting a higher pivot profit zone.

6. Chicken

Bullish

Entry: R2

Profit: H3 - R3

Bearish

Entry: S2

Profit L3 - S3

Pivot Strategy Matrix

Below is a 3x3 matrix for simple decision making on what strategy to use. The x-axis is the Strategy Bias to use. The y-axis is the Market Conditions you are interpreting.

  • Cells with an ❌ are not to be traded.
  • Cells with a 🟡 could be traded.
  • Cells with a 🟩, 🟦, or 🟥 are where the trading environment for both the Strategy Bias and Market Conditions match.

Advanced Setups

  1. Counter-trend
  2. Compressed Pivots
  3. Expanded Pivots
  4. Stacked Pivots

1. Counter-trend

Counter-trend trades mean using a Biased Pivot Strategy in reverse: entering the trade at the profit zone, and exiting the trade at the entry zone. It is the riskiest of all the advanced setups, because it is highly dependent on timing.

While not much, there is a rule of thumb for identifying counter-trend setups: if you hit the pivot profit zone for a strategy early, as in before the first half of the pivot's period is finished, then a counter-trend opportunity could exist.

2. Compressed Pivots

Compressed pivots are created when the prior trading period experiences low volatility, and the current R3 pivot is lower and S3 pivot is higher than the R3 and S3 pivot points from the prior period.

This exposes price in the trading period to reach prices past H2 and L2 more easily. Especially if there are any known volatile economic events planned for that period. Reaching or going past R3 and S3 is also far more likely when we get compressed pivots alongside volatile events.

3. Expanded Pivots

Expanded Pivots are created when the prior trading period experiences high volatility, the current R3 is higher and S3 is lower than the R3 and S3 pivot points from the prior period.

When volatility continues to expand and momentum is strong going into an expanded pivot can lead to a higher likelihood of bigger P/L swings. Though, those conditions seem to be the exception.

Most expanded pivots do not see continued rising volatility and strong momentum. This makes reaching pivot zones to trade a strategy less likely. Reaching pivots past R1 and S1 can especially become less likely to reach.

Targets must be reduced, and possibly smaller timeframe pivots, in order to trade Biased Pivot Strategies.

4. Stacked Pivots

Stacked Pivots refers to applying 2 or more copies of Wayne's Pivots Pro to your charts that use different timeframes, and then applying strategies to each one.

Pivots are "Stacked" when entry zone from the lower timeframe pivots line up with the entry zone of the higher timeframe pivots.

Stacked Pivots have a "Hierarchy" where the highest timeframe pivot, and its strategy, should take priority in trade decisions over the shorter timeframe pivots.

For example, during the first and last week of a month, the monthly pivot point levels are typically more useful than the weekly or daily pivot point levels. Hence, the monthly pivot points have Hierarchy control.

However, during the middle of a month, the weekly pivots can be especially useful for managing the trade's risk due to the responsiveness it has relative to the static monthly pivot: using weekly pivots for adding positions, limit orders, and managing stop loss orders to manage the trade of a higher Hierarchy monthly pivot. The same dynamics apply for daily and weekly pivots, and so on.

Midpoint Label Options

The regular Support and Resistance labels are not used to also label midpoint pivots. They have many label options based on preference.

By default, Wayne’s Pivots Pro will use the H# and L# labels for midpoint pivots. Midpoint pivots above the central pivot are labeled H#, referring to the H in High; and midpoint pivots labeled L# are below the central pivot, referring to the L in Low. This style is the most similar to how the regular Support and Resistance pivot points are already labeled.

There are midpoint label styles that use an M# prefix in a few ways. One sets all midpoint pivot to the label M, and then from the bottom to the top of the pivot range they're labeled in order starting from zero (0) up to the number of midpoint pivots drawn.

There's another M# prefix using ‘+’ and ‘-‘ symbols. Each midpoint pivot above the central pivot uses the ‘+’ label, and below uses the ‘-‘ label. For every sequential midpoint pivot, another ‘+’ or ‘-‘ symbol is added to the label. For example, the third midpoint pivot above and below the central pivot would be denoted as M+++ and M---.

Indicator Settings